TapRoot Farms / CSA - Community Shared Agriculture

What is CSA?

 

Community based farming at TapRoot farms in Annapolis Valley

Community Shared Agriculture is a relationship between you, the person accessing food to nourish your body and the farmer, the person or 

people growing your food. It is a direct relationship. This relationship is important. Food, along with water is all about our survival. We need food, water, shelter and love to survive. In Nova Scotia many of us are disconnected from the origins of our food. Many of us depend on the grocery store to provide our daily nourishment.

 

When you depend on the grocery store for your nourishment you are depending on a globalized food system. This food system is extensive and complex and does not depend on local farmers. It appears to us, that its main objective to make money regardless of the costs to people and planet.

 

A CSA is about our relationship. It is about sharing values. Yes, as farmers in Nova Scotia we need to make money, but in a CSA model, it is also about taking care of each other and taking care of the earth. It is about investing in where your food comes from, learning and knowing and trusting and tasting and experiencing the farm, the food, the community.

 

Being a member of a CSA is a way to be powerful and political as it relates to food. Food is powerful. Where you choose to get your food from has an impact that creates many ripples.

 

Our CSA offer members year round and seasonal options of vegetables, meat, fruit and eggs.

 

CSA boxes prepared for pickup at TapRoot farms in Annapolis valley

Commitment is hard. Farming is hard work and does require commitment from planning all the way to harvest and storing of crops or caring for animals. A CSA model requires a very large amount of commitment from both the farmer and the eater. It is really important that you seriously confront yourself and others in your home, asking if you are really able to make this commitment. There is nothing more devastating than having people join the CSA and then ask to quit because they don't like the food, or they find it is too expensive, or it isn't what they had hoped for. It is devastating because you get the email after you have just spend hours hooking up necessary irrigation to ensure the crop has water, or after struggling to get a whole field weeded before the plants are compromised. We need our members to commit to us, as we are committing to you. As customers/members you can quickly create an account, log on, click the membership agreement and purchase shares of vegetables for the year. We strongly encourage you not to do this. We encourage you to look over the newsletters from years past, look over the share listing from years past, look over our social media, read the details, talk to people, talk to us, come visit the farm. Seriously consider this.

 

We look forward to sharing the seasons with you, not one season but many. I invite you to think of joining a CSA as a new way to live life. A commitment to good food that takes care of not only our body, but of our heart and soul too.

 

CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) helps local small scale agricultureHere's a great resource, all about CSAs and supporting local:

http://www.fix.com/blog/farm-to-table/

Source: Fix.com